Mar 06

The Neil Gorsuch Effect on SCOTUS Labor Law Jurisprudence

By Michael C. DeBenedetto III. Judge Neil Gorsuch of the Tenth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals was recently nominated to the Supreme Court by President Donald Trump to replace the late Antonin Scalia. In this commentary, I address the questions of how Judge Gorsuch would likely lean over questions surrounding the major …

Continue reading »

Jan 30

Minor Leaguers, Minor Wages, Major Problems

By Joseph Gentile. Major League Baseball (“MLB”) and the Major League Baseball Players Association (“MLBPA”) recently came to terms on a new collective bargaining agreement (“CBA”), which will last through the 2021 MLB season. This means that, by the end of the next CBA, the MLB will have gone twenty-six consecutive seasons without a work …

Continue reading »

Nov 16

NLRB Adjusts Reimbursement Calculation for Unlawfully Discharged Employees

By Natalie Russell. In a recent decision issued by the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”), King Soopers, Inc. and Wendy Geaslin, persons who were wrongfully terminated may receive full reimbursement of search-for-work and interim employment expenses. Case 27-CA-129598 (2016). For over 80 years, the Board has awarded search-for-work damages. However, the Board’s traditional calculation …

Continue reading »

Oct 20

Peggy Browning Fund: 18th Annual National Law Students Workers’ Rights Conference

By Samantha Ojo. I had the pleasure of attending the 18th Annual National Law Students Workers’ Rights Conference, sponsored by the Peggy Browning Fund. The Peggy Browning Fund is an organization like no other, providing forty law students with stipends and summer fellowships in labor-related positions across the nation. The conference brought law students from …

Continue reading »

Oct 12

Columbia University: Board Overrules Brown University and Classifies Student Assistants as Employees

By Divya Acharya. Section 2(3) of the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) broadly defines an employee as “any employee,” subject to specified exceptions. Additionally, the Supreme Court has noted that the definition encompasses “any person who works for another in return for financial or other compensation.” Tasked with interpreting the wide-ranging breadth of this …

Continue reading »

Aug 29

St. John’s Law Student Front & Center

HC

Vice President of Planning for the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society and second year student, Courtney Sokol, was invited to the Hillary Clinton victory party for the New York Primary in mid-April.  Ms. Sokol, who took the opportunity to speak with numerous New York City politicians and St. John’s Law alumni, was photographed by …

Continue reading »

Aug 29

Recap: 2015-2016 School Year

The St. John’s Labor Relations and Employment Law Society hosted a number of noteworthy guests throughout the 2015-2016 school year. The speakers represented different areas of Labor and Employment Law, ranging from collective bargaining in professional sports to employment contracts with the the unionized workforce in New York City. In April, Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce …

Continue reading »

May 09

Transgender Employee Rights

By Natalie Russell. Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (“LGBT”) workers are seeing progress in the protection of transgender employee rights by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”). Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees against workplace discrimination “based on . . . sex.” Traditionally, however, the term “sex” was defined as one’s gender at birth. Any …

Continue reading »

Apr 18

Equal Pay for Equal Play

By Mary Cunningham. On April 12, the U.S. observed Equal Pay Day—a day created to discuss the pay gap between men and women. Equal Pay Day received special attention this year because of its temporal proximity to the day the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT), represented by five of its best players, filed a …

Continue reading »

Apr 12

Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association

By Ross Pollack. On March 29, 2016, the Supreme Court issued a divided 4-4 opinion in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, thus upholding the decision of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The one sentence opinion belies the importance of the case, which only two months earlier appeared as though it would nearly certainly cripple public sector …

Continue reading »

Older posts «