Sarah Mannix

Author's details

Name: Sarah Mannix
Date registered: March 15, 2013

Latest posts

  1. Remembering Cardinal Egan — March 15, 2015
  2. 2015 Scholarships – Apply Now! — February 18, 2015
  3. Attention Students: Upcoming Writing Competitions — November 11, 2014
  4. AFL-CIO Law Student Union Summer – Apply Now! — September 27, 2014
  5. Guest Speakers This Week! — September 15, 2014

Most commented posts

  1. The Roast of Professor Gregory: A Celebration of 30 Years of Teaching at St. John’s Law: April 5, 2013 — 2 comments
  2. Around the Web – Labor Day 2013 — 1 comment
  3. Congratulations to the 2013 Graduates! — 1 comment
  4. Alyssa Zuckerman speaks about the St. John’s Center for Labor and Employment Law — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Mar 15

Remembering Cardinal Egan

Cardinal Egan visits St. John's

The Center for Labor and Employment joins St. John’s Law, along with many others, in mourning the passing of Cardinal Edward M. Egan, who served as an honorary chair of the CLEL. The Center was honored to host Cardinal Egan last semester, and as Professor David. L. Gregory said, “Everyone at St. John’s was privileged to hear the wise words of the Church’s greatest canon lawyer… He will be missed.”

Feb 18

2015 Scholarships – Apply Now!

Attention Students!

We are taking applications for labor and employment law scholarships Tuesday, February 10 through March 5, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. There are many scholarships being awarded including the Coca-Cola Scholarship. All interested applicants should submit an hard copy AND electronic application by 6:00PM MARCH 5 TO JANET KROLL IN THE LAW SCHOOL.

Candidates applying for the Coca-Cola Scholarship should expressly note this in their cover letter. The Coca Cola Scholarship will be in the amount of $20,000 plus weekly compensation to be determined for the 2015 summer associate position with corporate Labor Relations.

The application for all scholarships consists of a cover letter, resume and unofficial transcript to my attention, highlighting grades received in Labor and Employment Law courses, co-curricular leadership positions in the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society, significant employment experience, cumulative grade point average and class rank. If you wish to be a candidate for the Coca Cola scholarship, your cover letter should expressly so state. You will be automatically considered for all scholarships. In addition, we hope to award prizes for excellent research papers, which should also be submitted at this time.

You must submit a hardcopy packet of the scholarship application and/or of the research paper to the 4th Floor reception area of the Dean’s office by 6:00 p.m. on Thursday March 5, 2015. You must simultaneously send an electronic copy to Janet Kroll at krollj@stjohns.edu.

Nov 11

Attention Students: Upcoming Writing Competitions

Any student who has written about a Labor or Employment law topic should check out these upcoming writing competitions. For the rules and regulations please see the individual competitions’ websites.

The Dr. Emanuel Stein and Kenneth D. Stein Memorial Writing Competition
New York State Bar Association Labor and Employment Law Section:
Deadline: December 5, 2014
Topic: ANY L&E law topic.
Contact: Beth Gould – bgould@nysba.org
More Information Here

Louis Jackson National Law Student Writing Competition in Employment and Labor Law Deadline: January 20, 2015
Topic: Any topic relating to the law governing the workplace, such as employment law, labor law, employee benefits, or employment discrimination.
Contact: Professor Martin H. Malin – mmalin@kentlaw.iit.edu
More Information Here

The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and the American Bar Association Section of Labor and Employment Law Annual Law Student Writing Competition
Deadline: May 15, 2015
Topic: Any aspect of public or private sector labor and/or employment law relevant to the American labor and employment bar.
Contact: Susan Wan – swan@laborandemploymentcollege.org
More Information Here

Sep 27

AFL-CIO Law Student Union Summer – Apply Now!

The AFL-CIO will once again be offering Law Student Union Summer (LSUS), an exciting program for law students that combines traditional legal research and analysis with front line activism. This 10-week internship combines public interest labor related legal work with union campaigning and organizing. This position is more than just a desk job, LSUS interns are involved in community outreach, member mobilization, corporate and other non-legal research, legislative campaigns and general litigation. Organizing activities, including canvassing, planning and implementing
solidarity-building activities and participating in meetings and home visits, are another primary component of the program.

The deadline is fast approaching for 2L’s interested in this program, please apply by October 17, 2014. Interested 1L’s must apply by January 16, 2015.

To apply, you must submit an application, cover letter (please see application for requirements), résumé,writing sample, law school transcript (may be unofficial), and current contact information for three references (preferably a combination of academic and/or work/internship-related). Send your application materials to AFL-CIO Law Student Union Summer.

Please see the flyer, application, and further eligibility guidelines below.

2015 Flyer

Eligibility & Requirements

Application 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 15

Guest Speakers This Week!

Please join the Professor Gregory and the LRELS for two exciting guest speakers this week!

September 16, 2014 – Jack Newhouse ‘12, an associate with Virginia & Ambinder LLP, will discuss wage and hour compensation claims from the plaintiff employee rights perspective. Mr. Newhouse’s practice areas are wage and hour class action litigation, and he has previously worked for both the NLRB and EEOC.

Room 2-12, 1:40 pm – 3:50 pm.

September 18, 2014 – Chair of EEOC, Presentation
The Honorable Jacqueline Berrien, the Chair of the EEOC Commission, will discuss the strategic initiatives of the Obama Administration.

Room 2-12, 6:15 pm — 7:50 pm.

Please see attached flyer for speaker bios and we hope to see you there!

Labor Relations FLYER

 

May 12

Video Link – Title VII at 50 Conference

n_uT1h9y08KPVcH90Nr_oXo4-ceRk5lJOC1-ro8R-2M,uag3aUMzRCkJqegYm-AjCBuVaCofjzsDqTvuxHTyK7M,ZRHRnUo5SWhOuBHWa5cZcfRT2dc5yuVxVWucTiDh0iYIf you missed the Title VII at Fifty Conference, you can now see what you missed on the video links. Thank you to St. John’s Law School’s IT team for putting this together.

Watch video of the two day event:

Video 1 – Day 1.

Video 2- Day 1

Video 3 – Day 1

Click http://128.122.159.212/pages/search.php?search=!collection284&k=769ca2463b for Video from Day 2, provided by NYU.

Apr 10

France to Ban Work Email After Work Hours

A new labor union agreement in France mandates that employees must ignore their bosses’ work emails once they are out of the office and relaxing at home – even on their smartphones. The Guardian reports that France has outlawed employees from reading or responding to “work-related material on their computers or smartphones” after they clock out for the day. This regulation is in response to workers in the tech industry complaining about feeling pressured to be constantly available outside of their 35 hour workweek. According to The Guardian, this will mainly affect over a million employees in the technology and consultancy sectors, including the French outposts of Google, Facebook, Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

If you read french, click here to read a discussion of this and the regulation. If you prefer to read about it in English and after 6pm, click here.

In today’s global economy, is it realistic to ban work email after-hours? Does “after-hours” even exist? These questions are all an outgrowth of this legislation, and while the thought of disconnecting and shutting down is appealing, do you think this regulation is a good idea?

Update: the labor agreement actually does not actually prevent checking emails after 6pm, because the class of workers covered by the agreement are paid based on days worked, not hours. So, the “obligation to disconnect communications tools”, applies only after an employee has worked a 13-hour day. Still, we wonder if this is the best way to help worker’s create a work life balance. More from The Economist here.

Mar 30

Title VII at 50 Symposium – THIS WEEK!

The Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society would like to invite any interested students or colleagues to the Title VII at 50 Symposium Conference, which takes place this week on April 4 and 5, 2014.

This program is presented in conjunction with the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, the NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law.

This two-day symposium commemorates Title VII and featuring panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII. Please see the attached program for the events schedule and speakers.

This is an amazing learning and networking opportunity for those interested in labor or employment law, and we encourage any interested party to attend. Please feel free to distribute the program and this email to any groups you are a member of. Scholarships and prizes will be awarded at this event.

The conference is free of charge and open to all, but please RSVP to Paula Edwards at (718) 990-6653 or clel@stjohns.edu.

We hope to see you in attendance at one or both days of the conference.

More Information: http://www.stjohns.edu/about/events/school-law-title-vii-50-two-day-symposium
Program – Title VII at 50 Symposium – 3-27-14

Mar 14

Workers sue McDonald’s for wage theft

McDonald'sYesterday, McDonald’s workers filed seven class-action lawsuits in New York, California and Michigan Thursday. The suits allege that McDonald’s has forced employees to work off the clock, not paid them overtime and struck hours off their time cards, and those discrepancies resulted in wage theft.

The suits varied by state. In New York, worker’s claimed that their wage was driven below the federal minimum wage because of unreimbursed expenses. In California, the workers alleges meal and break violations. In Michigan, workers claimed they would only start getting paid only when customers walked into the restaurants, even if they had been at work for hours.
All of these claims violate the federal Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and In all of these cases, the relationship between the franchises and the corporate parent company will be examined.

The suit comes in the midst of a long public relations campaign by fast-food workers demanding higher wages.The workers are represented by Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, which specializes in representing plaintiffs in class actions. This case will surely be a fascinating case to watch unfold. Click over to the New York Times for more on the beginnings of this case.

Mar 13

Around the Web: March 13, 2014

It might be 19˚ here in New York, but spring is almost here! With the change in seasons, there are a whole host of new issues coming down the pipeline. We are counting down the days until the Title VII at 50 Conference, and have put together a selection of current events that show just how relevant Title VII is today.

First on the list is President Obama’s call to update the minimum salary threshold and revamp overtime rules to expand overtime for salaried employees. This directive is expected to be announced via executive order today, read this before the announcement!
*Update from the New York Times*

Our own Professor Gregory is in the final stages of preparing a paper on Fisher v. University of Texas, and the far-reaching implications that the Supreme Court’s decision may have on diversity. The Wall Street Journal posted an interesting report on the challenges schools face to increase or maintain diversity. Read it and then let us know your views at the Title VII conference. H/T to Brendan Bertoli for this!

Going along with the Title VII theme, activists fighting the employment discrimination faced by the LGBT community are renewing a push for federal legislation that would prohibit anti-LGBT workplace discrimination. The Employment Non-Discrimination Act did not pass, but activists are hopeful that the president will issue an executive order circumventing the Congress. Click the link for an article framing the necessity of an anti-discrimination initiative.

The Ministerial Exception is making news with a recent case about a gay school administrator fired from a Catholic school. Read the links here, here and here about the issues this case is bringing up.

The EEOC has issued new guides to religious accommodations in the workplace. The documents, titled Religious Garb and Grooming in the Workplace: Rights and Responsibilities and an additional fact sheet, gives a guide to when and how employers must accommodate employees’ religiously based requests on clothing, religious dress, head coverings, hair styles, and facial hair. These sheets provide a cheat sheet of the basic requirements of Title VII and provide case specific examples.

What news stories are on your radar? Let us know what you’re thinking in the comments, and don’t forget to mark the Title VII at 50 conference (April 4-5) on your calendar!

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