Tag Archive: Center for Labor and Employment Law

Mar 30

Title VII at 50 Symposium – THIS WEEK!

The Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society would like to invite any interested students or colleagues to the Title VII at 50 Symposium Conference, which takes place this week on April 4 and 5, 2014.

This program is presented in conjunction with the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, the NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law.

This two-day symposium commemorates Title VII and featuring panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII. Please see the attached program for the events schedule and speakers.

This is an amazing learning and networking opportunity for those interested in labor or employment law, and we encourage any interested party to attend. Please feel free to distribute the program and this email to any groups you are a member of. Scholarships and prizes will be awarded at this event.

The conference is free of charge and open to all, but please RSVP to Paula Edwards at (718) 990-6653 or clel@stjohns.edu.

We hope to see you in attendance at one or both days of the conference.

More Information: http://www.stjohns.edu/about/events/school-law-title-vii-50-two-day-symposium
Program – Title VII at 50 Symposium – 3-27-14

Mar 13

Around the Web: March 13, 2014

It might be 19˚ here in New York, but spring is almost here! With the change in seasons, there are a whole host of new issues coming down the pipeline. We are counting down the days until the Title VII at 50 Conference, and have put together a selection of current events that show just how relevant Title VII is today.

First on the list is President Obama’s call to update the minimum salary threshold and revamp overtime rules to expand overtime for salaried employees. This directive is expected to be announced via executive order today, read this before the announcement!
*Update from the New York Times*

Our own Professor Gregory is in the final stages of preparing a paper on Fisher v. University of Texas, and the far-reaching implications that the Supreme Court’s decision may have on diversity. The Wall Street Journal posted an interesting report on the challenges schools face to increase or maintain diversity. Read it and then let us know your views at the Title VII conference. H/T to Brendan Bertoli for this!

Going along with the Title VII theme, activists fighting the employment discrimination faced by the LGBT community are renewing a push for federal legislation that would prohibit anti-LGBT workplace discrimination. The Employment Non-Discrimination Act did not pass, but activists are hopeful that the president will issue an executive order circumventing the Congress. Click the link for an article framing the necessity of an anti-discrimination initiative.

The Ministerial Exception is making news with a recent case about a gay school administrator fired from a Catholic school. Read the links here, here and here about the issues this case is bringing up.

The EEOC has issued new guides to religious accommodations in the workplace. The documents, titled Religious Garb and Grooming in the Workplace: Rights and Responsibilities and an additional fact sheet, gives a guide to when and how employers must accommodate employees’ religiously based requests on clothing, religious dress, head coverings, hair styles, and facial hair. These sheets provide a cheat sheet of the basic requirements of Title VII and provide case specific examples.

What news stories are on your radar? Let us know what you’re thinking in the comments, and don’t forget to mark the Title VII at 50 conference (April 4-5) on your calendar!

Mar 03

Events and Photo’s – Distinguished Speaker Series

On February 19, 2014, the Center for Labor and Employment Law hosted a Distinguished Speaker Series event- A Conversation with Harry I. Johnson, III, member of the National Labor Relations Board. This
event was held in the Mattone Family Atrium, where Mr. Johnson was joined by students, alumni and friends to tell about his experience and perspective on his role at the National Labor Relations Board. Mr. Johnson was introduced by alumni and former co-presidents of the LRELS, Sean Conroy ’95 and Michael Masri ’95. Students at the event felt that this was one of the best events and most engaging speaker series that they have attended in law school. Mr. Johnson spoke about recent decisions including cases on social media and employee handbook, and the tremendous workload of cases for the agency. Law student Josephine McGrath ’15 said, “the content and presentation of the speech was fascinating and gave an inside view of the challenges that the NLRB navigates.” Dinner at Alberto’s followed the event and the students in attendance were able to speak with Mr. Johnson and other alumni guests.

The next morning, Mr. Johnson addressed Professor Gregory’s labor law class, which started with the presentation of Professor Gregory’s labor law book. Mr. Johnson taught the class before returning to his busy schedule in Washington DC. Overall, this visit was a great learning opportunity and an amazing chance for students to get an inside view of the workings of the NLRB. Thank you to Mr. Johnson and Mr. Conroy for visiting us and we hope to have you back soon!

Click through the photo gallery to view photos from the event.

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Feb 20

What’s New With the CLEL – Spring Update

The Center for Labor and Employment works closely with the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society at St. John’s. The LRELS is the student-run arm of the Center and is headed by President May Mansour ‘14, Co-Vice Presidents Sarah Mannix ‘15 and Rich Berrios ‘14, Treasurer Monica Hincken ’14 and Secretary Samantha Kimmel ‘15. Next year, Cynthia Vella ’16 and Stephen Halouvas ’15 will join the board. In addition to the many opportunities offered by he LRELS and the Center for Labor and Employment, there are several exciting events taking place this semester.

The first event was a Distinguished Speaker Series, A Conversation with Harry I. Johnson III, a former partner at Arent Fox and a current NLRB Member appointed by President Obama. This event took place on February 19 and Mr. Johnson joined Professor Gregory’s labor law class on February 20 as well to give a speech about recent NLRB decisions, the decision making process and how the agency operates. Mr. Johnson graciously spoke to the attendees and provided fascinating and entertaining insights into the NRLB. (Stay tuned for pictures of the event!)

Next up, he Center for Labor and Employment will co-host a symposium entitled Title VII at 50, with NYU Law School, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development, on April 4-5, 2014. 2014 is the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the programs will celebrate the evolution of Title VII over the years and the current state of the law. In attendance will be some of our most distinguished alumni as well as very prominent academics and practicing attorneys in the field. Some of the presenters will include: Paulette Brown, President-Elect of the ABA; Amanda Jaret ’13, Law Fellow AFL-CIO; Samuel Estreicher, Director of the Center for Labor and Employment Law at New York University; as well as other NLRB directors, and Professors. Over Friday and Saturday there will be roundtables and panel discussions covering a variety of topics including Professor Gregory’s forthcoming paper, “Past as Prologue in the Affirmative Action Jurisprudence of the Supreme Court: Reflections on Fisher v. University of Texas.” The conference will be an exploration of the living history of Title VII while looking ahead to what the next fifty years will bring. The winners of the inaugural Edwards Wildman Palmer Prize and the 2014 Coca-Cola Refreshments Scholar will be announced at the conference.

There are many opportunities to get involved with the Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society. Please follow the TWEN page or visit stjclelblog.org to stay updated on the happenings and scholarship opportunities.

Jan 10

Announcements!

The first general body meeting of the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society will be Tuesday January 14 at 5:30 pm in room 2M-01. We have election results and be discussing our events for this semester including several panel discussions, distinguished speakers and the Title VII at 50 Symposium. Any student with an interest is encouraged to come and get involved! Make sure to add us on TWEN to get email updates for meetings and events!

Any student who wishes to speak with Professor Gregory about career opportunities must attend this meeting. Please see this memo outlining the requirements and priority for meetings with him! Don’t forget your computer and resume!
labor law society general meeting january 14 2014 -2

Any student who received a grade of C or below in the fall semester 2013 Employment Law or Employment Discrimination class is welcome to review their exam beginning the week of Tuesday, January 21. All other students may review their exams beginning the week of Monday, January 27. To make an appointment for a review, please contact Ms. Paula Edwards, after January 2 (edwardsp@stjohns.edu; 718 990 6653.)

Check out the scholarship page for newly updated scholarships and summer opportunities!

Dec 27

Title VII at 50 Symposium – Save the Date

2014 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that fundamentally altered the landscape of employment relations by prohibiting discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. It is part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which also barred discrimination in public accommodations, public facilities and voting. By its enactment, notions of equality were more deeply embedded in United States public law.

On April 4-5, 2014, the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, in conjunction with NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, the St. John’s Center for Labor and Employment Law, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law, will host a two-day symposium commemorating this important milestone, which will feature panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The symposium invites scholars and practitioners to participate in a multi-disciplinary evaluation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

If you would like information about attending this event, please fill out the form below! We will keep your information and contact you with more information in the near future!

Nov 12

Professor Gregory in the News

Our own Professor David L. Gregory, executive director of the Center for Labor and Employment Law at St. John’s University School of Law, has been quoted several times in the New York Times in the past week. As a preeminent scholar on labor and employment law issues, Professor Gregory was quoted on varied current events, ranging from all municipal unions in New York City to the recent scandal involving workplace misconduct at the Miami Dolphins Franchise. See the links below for the past week’s articles and feel free to submit any that we might have missed in the comments!


For de Blasio, Contract Talks Offer Problem


N.F.L. Picks Lawyer to Lead Inquiry Into Dolphins

Oct 29

Around the Web – Halloween Edition

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween!

If your costume and your recipe for witches brew are all ready for Thursday, you might think you’re all set for Halloween! Although this mostly secular (and highly commercialized) holiday may seem like an excuse to eat candy all day, some employers have discovered the pitfalls of celebrating this holiday in the workplace. There have been Title VII cases brought on behalf of employee’s whose religion does not permit them to celebrate this holiday. This case involves the Title VII claim of a Jehovah’s Witness who was asked to participate in a Halloween carnival despite her religious beliefs. Some Christian sects do not celebrate Halloween in protest of the holiday’s pagan roots.

The importance of sensitivity to religious observance is a hot topic lately. This article from the Wall Street Journal highlights the importance of sensitivity to religion in the workplace and the rise of religious discrimination claims. Read the article here.

A key point for employers and managers is to remember that if someone does not want to participate in Halloween festivities, do not make them. Here’s a refresher of EEOC guidelines on religious discrimination.

If you do celebrate, submit your costume to the Above the Law costume contest and check out FindLaw’s tips for a spooktacular Halloween!

Halloween bonus: A scary story… a messy office could earn you fines from the Department of Labor, just ask Rebecca Minkoff.

Happy Halloween!

Oct 26

15th Annual Worker’s Rights Conference

On October 25th and 26th, I had the privilege of attending the Peggy Browning Fund’s 15th Annual National Law Students Worker’s Rights Conference in Linthicum Heights, Maryland.  The event brought together law students across the country interested in the future of workers’ rights. The conference gave a greater understanding of the issues facing American workers, and was an opportunity to network with fellow students, and top practitioners in the field.

On Friday evening, conference attendees were treated to a showing of Trash Dance.  The film explored an artist’s organization of sanitation workers in Austin, Texas for a performance piece.  After the film, students offered opinions about the film’s metaphors for worker organization.

On Saturday morning, AFL-CIO General Counsel and former NLRB Member Craig Becker delivered the conference’s keynote address.  Mr. Becker reflected on his own experiences when speaking about unions’ future challenges.  He also offered insights into labor cases on the Supreme Court’s current docket and organized labor’s reception of the Affordable Care Act.

Students then participated in workshops that covered various salient issues. I attended three different workshops, all led by prominent figures in organized labor. Dennis Walsh, Regional Director of Region 4 of the NLRB, discussed the NLRA’s nuances in “Introduction to Basic Labor Law”. Fred Feinstein, former General Counsel to the NLRB, detailed how anti-union consultants grew from cottage industry to well-oiled machine in “Future of Worker Mobilization”. Baldwin Robertson, partner of Woodley & McGillivary, summarized issues facing state and municipal union members in “Public Sector Labor Law”.

In the plenary session on Saturday afternoon, panelists Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Peggy Shorey summarized new assaults on collective bargaining rights in the states, including new right-to-work initiatives and movements to end dues check-offs.  In closing remarks, Dennis Walsh, Marley Weiss and Joe Lurie thanked all conference organizers for their hard work in putting together the engaging and educational programming. It was my pleasure to represent St. John’s University School of Law at the conference.  The Peggy Browning Fund’s programs contribute greatly to the labor law community, and I was fortunate to be a part of this year’s conference.

Panelists (L to R): Peggy Shorey, Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Matthew Ginsburg.

Panelists (L to R): Peggy Shorey, Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Matthew Ginsburg.

Oct 03

With Courage We Shall Fight – Distinguished Speaker Series at St. John’s

Ralph S. Berger and Albert S. Berger sign copies of their book, With Courage We Shall Fight, a memoir of their parent's lives as Jewish  Resistance Fighters

Ralph S. Berger and Albert S. Berger sign copies of their book, With Courage We Shall Fight, a memoir of their parent’s lives as Jewish Resistance Fighters

On October 2, 2013, the Distinguished Speaker Series at St. John’s welcomed Ralph S. Berger and Albert S. Berger, editors of the book With Courage We Shall Fight, a primary source about the incredible survival story and fight against the Nazis by their parents, Murray “Motke” and Frances “Fruma” Berger. The event was sponsored by the Jewish Law Students Association (and co-sponsored by: The Catholic Law Students Association, The Center for Labor & Employment Law, The Journal OF Civil Rights and Economic Devlopment and the Student Bar Association).

The brothers lectured on the incredible story of their parents, Motke and Fruma, before, during and after World War II. Motke and Fruma met as members of the “Bielski Brigade” a group of Jewish resistance fighters who saved over 1200 Jews from Nazi concentration camps. The Bielski Brigade was depicted in the movie “Defiance” with Daniel Craig. With Courage We shall Fight is a memoir written in prose and poetry which tells the story of Motke and Fruma and those that they met during their time with the Partisans.

As Ralph Berger said, their parent’s mission was to pass on the story of those who had died during the war, because the only way to remember them would be to share their story with others. The stories told by the brothers left the audience with chills. The title of the book came from a line of Fruma’s poems. Another of Fruma’s poems, “The Little Orphan” was read during the presentation by Josephine McGrath ’15.

Hearing the brothers speak about their parents and their experiences was a powerful history lesson and way to make sure that their bravery will never be forgotten. Ralph Berger recounted the story of a woman who came up to the brothers at a Bar Mitzvah, years after the war in California. She had recognized Murray Berger’s sons and told them that their father had carried her and her son out of ghetto during the war. The impact that the Partisans had would never be forgotten by those they had saved; and the brothers learned part of their father’s history that they had never heard before. Those in attendance were privileged to hear about the Partisans and this important chapter in history.

The book is a primary account of the Holocaust and the Jewish Partisan’s fight for vengeance against the Nazis. Copies of With Courage Shall We Fight are available from the publisher, the Museum of Jewish Heritage, and from Amazon.com. All proceeds are donated to support Holocaust education.

Thank you to all who joined us for this great event!

Samantha Kimmel '15 speaks with Ralph S. Berger

Samantha Kimmel ’15 speaks with Ralph S. Berger

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