Tag Archive: St. John’s Law

Nov 11

Attention Students: Upcoming Writing Competitions

Any student who has written about a Labor or Employment law topic should check out these upcoming writing competitions. For the rules and regulations please see the individual competitions’ websites.

The Dr. Emanuel Stein and Kenneth D. Stein Memorial Writing Competition
New York State Bar Association Labor and Employment Law Section:
Deadline: December 5, 2014
Topic: ANY L&E law topic.
Contact: Beth Gould – bgould@nysba.org
More Information Here

Louis Jackson National Law Student Writing Competition in Employment and Labor Law Deadline: January 20, 2015
Topic: Any topic relating to the law governing the workplace, such as employment law, labor law, employee benefits, or employment discrimination.
Contact: Professor Martin H. Malin – mmalin@kentlaw.iit.edu
More Information Here

The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and the American Bar Association Section of Labor and Employment Law Annual Law Student Writing Competition
Deadline: May 15, 2015
Topic: Any aspect of public or private sector labor and/or employment law relevant to the American labor and employment bar.
Contact: Susan Wan – swan@laborandemploymentcollege.org
More Information Here

May 12

Video Link – Title VII at 50 Conference

n_uT1h9y08KPVcH90Nr_oXo4-ceRk5lJOC1-ro8R-2M,uag3aUMzRCkJqegYm-AjCBuVaCofjzsDqTvuxHTyK7M,ZRHRnUo5SWhOuBHWa5cZcfRT2dc5yuVxVWucTiDh0iYIf you missed the Title VII at Fifty Conference, you can now see what you missed on the video links. Thank you to St. John’s Law School’s IT team for putting this together.

Watch video of the two day event:

Video 1 – Day 1.

Video 2- Day 1

Video 3 – Day 1

Click http://128.122.159.212/pages/search.php?search=!collection284&k=769ca2463b for Video from Day 2, provided by NYU.

Apr 23

Title VII at Fifty Symposium – Day One Overview

On April 4th and April 5th, the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society co-hosted the Title VII at 50 Symposium in conjunction with with NYU Law School, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development. For the 50th anniversary of the passing of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the symposium focused on how far we’ve come in the last 50 years and how far we have to go in the hopes of eliminating employment and racial discrimination altogether.

The first day was kicked off by Professor David Gregory, co-chair of the Symposium, Vice Emeritus Dean Andrew Simons and the President of the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society, May Mansour ’14. The morning panel was entitled, “The Living History of Title VII: Voices of 1964, and Passing the Torch to a New” and was moderated by Professor Cheryl L. Wade, the Dean Harold F. McNeice Professor of Law at St. John’s University. The panelists were: Paulette Brown, President Elect of the ABA, Dean Andrew Simons, and former U.S. Congressman Rev. Doctor Floyd H. Flake. Paulette Brown spoke of her ability to go to a newly integrated school because of Title VII, although the new environment was far from encouraging. Rev. Dr. Floyd H. Flake, Former U.S. Congressman and Senior Pastor for the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral of New York, discussed how racial minority groups are still facing challenges they should not have to face. With graduation rates for African Americans, Latinos and Asians at 32%, 62% and 75% respectively, Rev. Dr. Flake said that these groups should be in a position today to do what they want to do in regards to their careers and to have the lifestyle they hope for. Vice Emeritus Dean Andrew Simons discussed the case New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, as well as Johnson’s address before a joint session of Congress after President John F. Kennedy where he said no eulogy would be better than the earliest possible passage of the Civil Rights bill.

Before lunch, Professor Gregory and Paulette Brown announced Ralph Carter ’14 as the winner of the Inaugural Edwards Wildman Palmer for Best Paper on Fair Employment Law 2013-14 for his paper on an employer’s use of their employee’s social media information and passwords. During lunch, Professor Janai S. Nelson, 
Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship 
and Associate Director of 
The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, introduced her former colleague and mentor Jacqueline A. Berrien as the keynote speaker. Ms. Berrien is the current chair 
of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). She recounted her time as Associate Director-Counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), where she worked prior to being nominated by President Obama to be chair of the EEOC. Berrien then discussed the initiatives and actions being taken by the EEOC since her appointment to shrink the discrimination seen in the workplace through the charges of discrimination brought forth to the EEOC.

After lunch, an all-female panel presented stories of race, gender, ethnicity, and diversity as well as their roles as scholars and journalists. “Stories of Race, Gender, Ethnicity, and Diversity: The Roles of Scholars and Journalists” was moderated by Special Hagan, who kept the debate flowing and the questions coming in a fascinating panel that explored the many different facets of diversity.

Rebecca K. Lee, an 
Associate Professor of Law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, discussed Fisher v. University of Texas, affirmative action and applying strict scrutiny in higher education. Kimani Paul-Emile, 
an Associate Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law, explained her research of employers use of background checks and criminal records in determining whether to hire an applicant as well as if they will terminate an employee if a record is found. Kathleen Wells, a 
Radio Host 
and Multi Media Journalist, discussed research that showed that we still have a long way to go before discrimination is a thing of the past. Sahar F. Aziz, Associate Professor of Law at 
Texas A&M University School of Law, discussed research she conducted that shows the stereotypes facing women, in particular Muslims, and ways in which these women go about trying to remove these stereotypes. Natasha Martin,
 Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Law
 at Seattle University School of Law, talked about how there are still echoes of Jim Crowe laws in the workplace. Lastly, Professor Elayne E. Greenberg, 
Assistant Dean of Dispute Resolution Programs, Professor of Legal Practice
 and Director of the 
Hugh L. Carey Center for Dispute Resolution at 
St. John’s, discussed implicit biases and how those biases effect decisions made.

The last roundtable of the day discussed affirmative action through the reflections on Fisher v. University of Texas with Professor Gregory, Professor Rebecca Lee, and Professor Gregory’s research students Brendan A. Bertoli ’14, Courtney Chicvak ‘14 
and Sarah Mannix ’15. Bertoli, Chicvak and Mannix discussed their research regarding the Fisher case and how it starts to show where the Supreme Court is heading in regards to Affirmative Action. In addition, Professor Lee provided a deeper analysis from her previous panel discussion into strict scrutiny. Ms. Mannix recalled her experience on the panel as ” a really excellent forum to discuss our research and findings with out practitioners and academics, and a great opportunity for discussion!”

Professor Leonard Baynes, the Ronald H. Brown Professor of Law at St. John’s and Stephanie Rainaud ’15, Symposium Editor for the Journal of Economic and Civil Rights closed out Day One.

Specials thanks to everyone who came out to the Title VII Symposium and who shared their time and experiences on this day.

Mar 30

Title VII at 50 Symposium – THIS WEEK!

The Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society would like to invite any interested students or colleagues to the Title VII at 50 Symposium Conference, which takes place this week on April 4 and 5, 2014.

This program is presented in conjunction with the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, the NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law.

This two-day symposium commemorates Title VII and featuring panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII. Please see the attached program for the events schedule and speakers.

This is an amazing learning and networking opportunity for those interested in labor or employment law, and we encourage any interested party to attend. Please feel free to distribute the program and this email to any groups you are a member of. Scholarships and prizes will be awarded at this event.

The conference is free of charge and open to all, but please RSVP to Paula Edwards at (718) 990-6653 or clel@stjohns.edu.

We hope to see you in attendance at one or both days of the conference.

More Information: http://www.stjohns.edu/about/events/school-law-title-vii-50-two-day-symposium
Program – Title VII at 50 Symposium – 3-27-14

Mar 03

Events and Photo’s – Distinguished Speaker Series

On February 19, 2014, the Center for Labor and Employment Law hosted a Distinguished Speaker Series event- A Conversation with Harry I. Johnson, III, member of the National Labor Relations Board. This
event was held in the Mattone Family Atrium, where Mr. Johnson was joined by students, alumni and friends to tell about his experience and perspective on his role at the National Labor Relations Board. Mr. Johnson was introduced by alumni and former co-presidents of the LRELS, Sean Conroy ’95 and Michael Masri ’95. Students at the event felt that this was one of the best events and most engaging speaker series that they have attended in law school. Mr. Johnson spoke about recent decisions including cases on social media and employee handbook, and the tremendous workload of cases for the agency. Law student Josephine McGrath ’15 said, “the content and presentation of the speech was fascinating and gave an inside view of the challenges that the NLRB navigates.” Dinner at Alberto’s followed the event and the students in attendance were able to speak with Mr. Johnson and other alumni guests.

The next morning, Mr. Johnson addressed Professor Gregory’s labor law class, which started with the presentation of Professor Gregory’s labor law book. Mr. Johnson taught the class before returning to his busy schedule in Washington DC. Overall, this visit was a great learning opportunity and an amazing chance for students to get an inside view of the workings of the NLRB. Thank you to Mr. Johnson and Mr. Conroy for visiting us and we hope to have you back soon!

Click through the photo gallery to view photos from the event.

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Feb 20

What’s New With the CLEL – Spring Update

The Center for Labor and Employment works closely with the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society at St. John’s. The LRELS is the student-run arm of the Center and is headed by President May Mansour ‘14, Co-Vice Presidents Sarah Mannix ‘15 and Rich Berrios ‘14, Treasurer Monica Hincken ’14 and Secretary Samantha Kimmel ‘15. Next year, Cynthia Vella ’16 and Stephen Halouvas ’15 will join the board. In addition to the many opportunities offered by he LRELS and the Center for Labor and Employment, there are several exciting events taking place this semester.

The first event was a Distinguished Speaker Series, A Conversation with Harry I. Johnson III, a former partner at Arent Fox and a current NLRB Member appointed by President Obama. This event took place on February 19 and Mr. Johnson joined Professor Gregory’s labor law class on February 20 as well to give a speech about recent NLRB decisions, the decision making process and how the agency operates. Mr. Johnson graciously spoke to the attendees and provided fascinating and entertaining insights into the NRLB. (Stay tuned for pictures of the event!)

Next up, he Center for Labor and Employment will co-host a symposium entitled Title VII at 50, with NYU Law School, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development, on April 4-5, 2014. 2014 is the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the programs will celebrate the evolution of Title VII over the years and the current state of the law. In attendance will be some of our most distinguished alumni as well as very prominent academics and practicing attorneys in the field. Some of the presenters will include: Paulette Brown, President-Elect of the ABA; Amanda Jaret ’13, Law Fellow AFL-CIO; Samuel Estreicher, Director of the Center for Labor and Employment Law at New York University; as well as other NLRB directors, and Professors. Over Friday and Saturday there will be roundtables and panel discussions covering a variety of topics including Professor Gregory’s forthcoming paper, “Past as Prologue in the Affirmative Action Jurisprudence of the Supreme Court: Reflections on Fisher v. University of Texas.” The conference will be an exploration of the living history of Title VII while looking ahead to what the next fifty years will bring. The winners of the inaugural Edwards Wildman Palmer Prize and the 2014 Coca-Cola Refreshments Scholar will be announced at the conference.

There are many opportunities to get involved with the Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society. Please follow the TWEN page or visit stjclelblog.org to stay updated on the happenings and scholarship opportunities.

Jan 10

Announcements!

The first general body meeting of the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society will be Tuesday January 14 at 5:30 pm in room 2M-01. We have election results and be discussing our events for this semester including several panel discussions, distinguished speakers and the Title VII at 50 Symposium. Any student with an interest is encouraged to come and get involved! Make sure to add us on TWEN to get email updates for meetings and events!

Any student who wishes to speak with Professor Gregory about career opportunities must attend this meeting. Please see this memo outlining the requirements and priority for meetings with him! Don’t forget your computer and resume!
labor law society general meeting january 14 2014 -2

Any student who received a grade of C or below in the fall semester 2013 Employment Law or Employment Discrimination class is welcome to review their exam beginning the week of Tuesday, January 21. All other students may review their exams beginning the week of Monday, January 27. To make an appointment for a review, please contact Ms. Paula Edwards, after January 2 (edwardsp@stjohns.edu; 718 990 6653.)

Check out the scholarship page for newly updated scholarships and summer opportunities!

Oct 26

15th Annual Worker’s Rights Conference

On October 25th and 26th, I had the privilege of attending the Peggy Browning Fund’s 15th Annual National Law Students Worker’s Rights Conference in Linthicum Heights, Maryland.  The event brought together law students across the country interested in the future of workers’ rights. The conference gave a greater understanding of the issues facing American workers, and was an opportunity to network with fellow students, and top practitioners in the field.

On Friday evening, conference attendees were treated to a showing of Trash Dance.  The film explored an artist’s organization of sanitation workers in Austin, Texas for a performance piece.  After the film, students offered opinions about the film’s metaphors for worker organization.

On Saturday morning, AFL-CIO General Counsel and former NLRB Member Craig Becker delivered the conference’s keynote address.  Mr. Becker reflected on his own experiences when speaking about unions’ future challenges.  He also offered insights into labor cases on the Supreme Court’s current docket and organized labor’s reception of the Affordable Care Act.

Students then participated in workshops that covered various salient issues. I attended three different workshops, all led by prominent figures in organized labor. Dennis Walsh, Regional Director of Region 4 of the NLRB, discussed the NLRA’s nuances in “Introduction to Basic Labor Law”. Fred Feinstein, former General Counsel to the NLRB, detailed how anti-union consultants grew from cottage industry to well-oiled machine in “Future of Worker Mobilization”. Baldwin Robertson, partner of Woodley & McGillivary, summarized issues facing state and municipal union members in “Public Sector Labor Law”.

In the plenary session on Saturday afternoon, panelists Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Peggy Shorey summarized new assaults on collective bargaining rights in the states, including new right-to-work initiatives and movements to end dues check-offs.  In closing remarks, Dennis Walsh, Marley Weiss and Joe Lurie thanked all conference organizers for their hard work in putting together the engaging and educational programming. It was my pleasure to represent St. John’s University School of Law at the conference.  The Peggy Browning Fund’s programs contribute greatly to the labor law community, and I was fortunate to be a part of this year’s conference.

Panelists (L to R): Peggy Shorey, Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Matthew Ginsburg.

Panelists (L to R): Peggy Shorey, Leon Dayan, Jessica Robinson, and Matthew Ginsburg.

Sep 18

FLSA Update: New Rule Expands Coverage to Home Care Workers

Photo Credit: VA

Photo Credit: VA

Yesterday, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced the final version of a rule that will expand the coverage provided by the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  Under the new rule, home care workers will be protected by the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the FLSA.[1]  Although home care workers whose primary role is to provide companionship to the patient remain exempt from the provisions, the expansion of coverage is expected to bring approximately 2 million additional workers under the coverage umbrella.[2]

Already, both sides of the issue have expressed opinions on why the expanded coverage either will or will not be a good thing in the long run.  Proponents of the new rule have highlighted the fact that a large number of workers who were traditionally underpaid for the services and hours they provided may now have an opportunity to earn a fair salary.[3]  Opponents of the new rule warn of “unintended consequences” that will result from requiring the payment of minimum wage and, in particular, overtime.[4]  They believe that one potential consequence will be the creation of an underground industry within the home health care industry comprised of workers who do not have proper training.[5]

The new rule takes effect January 1, 2015.[6]  Between now and then, the DOL will work with stakeholders in the industry, including the agencies who employ home care workers, home care workers, and patients, on implementation.[7]  More information, including fact sheets and details about upcoming webinars, are available at a special DOL website, which can be accessed here.


[1] United States Department of Labor, Minimum wage, overtime protections extended to direct care workers by US Department of Labor, September 17, 2013, available at http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/whd/WHD20131922.htm.

[2] Id.

[3] Bryce Covert, Why It Matters That Home Care Workers Just Got New Labor Rights, Think Progress, September 17, 2013, available at http://www.thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/09/17/2634411/home-care-workers-rule-change.

[4] Angela Gonzales, New ruling on home care workers could mean bigger bills for consumers, Phoenix Business Journal, September 17, 2013, available at http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2013/09/new-ruling-on-home-care-workers-could.html.

[5] Id.

[6] Department of Labor, supra at note 1.

[7] Id.

Sep 17

Management Lawyer’s Colloquium

A distinguished panel of alumni and guests joined the CLEL and the LRELS for a spirited and engaging panel on current issues in management-side employment law. Scholarships winners were announced. Congratulations to May Mansour ’14 and Eugene Ubawike ’15 for taking home the Cesar Chavez Memorial Prize and the Alan C. Becker Memorial Prize from Jackson Lewis LLP. The panelists included: Daniel Costello ’99, Vanessa Delaney ’12, Christopher Kurtz ’03, Craig Roberts ’97, Ana Shields ’03, Richard Zuckerman, Natalia Torres, Robert Lafferty, and David Marshall.

The panel discussion ranged from career advice to privacy rights and the implications of the Affordable Care Act.

The panelists spoke about their career paths and what has made them successful in the field. The panelists viewed integrity as a key attribute in building trust and effective relationships; and creating this relationship with clients is a major part of the job.

On the issue of privacy, Richard Zuckerman discussed how employers must balance the need to keep track of employees while making sure not to violate any constitutional protections, such as against unreasonable searches and seizures. Other panelists discussed the right to monitor employee phone calls, GPS tracking, bag searches, and taping phone calls without the person’s consent.

The topic of social media and technology was explored. Several panelists shared their views on how Facebook and other social networking websites have opened up new possibilities as well as problems with privacy.

Overall, the event was extremely informative and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society would like to thank the panelists, all who were able to attend and congratulate May and Eugene on their accomplishments!

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