Tag Archive: symposium

May 12

Video Link – Title VII at 50 Conference

n_uT1h9y08KPVcH90Nr_oXo4-ceRk5lJOC1-ro8R-2M,uag3aUMzRCkJqegYm-AjCBuVaCofjzsDqTvuxHTyK7M,ZRHRnUo5SWhOuBHWa5cZcfRT2dc5yuVxVWucTiDh0iYIf you missed the Title VII at Fifty Conference, you can now see what you missed on the video links. Thank you to St. John’s Law School’s IT team for putting this together.

Watch video of the two day event:

Video 1 – Day 1.

Video 2- Day 1

Video 3 – Day 1

Click http://128.122.159.212/pages/search.php?search=!collection284&k=769ca2463b for Video from Day 2, provided by NYU.

Apr 23

Title VII at Fifty Symposium – Day One Overview

On April 4th and April 5th, the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society co-hosted the Title VII at 50 Symposium in conjunction with with NYU Law School, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development. For the 50th anniversary of the passing of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the symposium focused on how far we’ve come in the last 50 years and how far we have to go in the hopes of eliminating employment and racial discrimination altogether.

The first day was kicked off by Professor David Gregory, co-chair of the Symposium, Vice Emeritus Dean Andrew Simons and the President of the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society, May Mansour ’14. The morning panel was entitled, “The Living History of Title VII: Voices of 1964, and Passing the Torch to a New” and was moderated by Professor Cheryl L. Wade, the Dean Harold F. McNeice Professor of Law at St. John’s University. The panelists were: Paulette Brown, President Elect of the ABA, Dean Andrew Simons, and former U.S. Congressman Rev. Doctor Floyd H. Flake. Paulette Brown spoke of her ability to go to a newly integrated school because of Title VII, although the new environment was far from encouraging. Rev. Dr. Floyd H. Flake, Former U.S. Congressman and Senior Pastor for the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral of New York, discussed how racial minority groups are still facing challenges they should not have to face. With graduation rates for African Americans, Latinos and Asians at 32%, 62% and 75% respectively, Rev. Dr. Flake said that these groups should be in a position today to do what they want to do in regards to their careers and to have the lifestyle they hope for. Vice Emeritus Dean Andrew Simons discussed the case New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, as well as Johnson’s address before a joint session of Congress after President John F. Kennedy where he said no eulogy would be better than the earliest possible passage of the Civil Rights bill.

Before lunch, Professor Gregory and Paulette Brown announced Ralph Carter ’14 as the winner of the Inaugural Edwards Wildman Palmer for Best Paper on Fair Employment Law 2013-14 for his paper on an employer’s use of their employee’s social media information and passwords. During lunch, Professor Janai S. Nelson, 
Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship 
and Associate Director of 
The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, introduced her former colleague and mentor Jacqueline A. Berrien as the keynote speaker. Ms. Berrien is the current chair 
of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). She recounted her time as Associate Director-Counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), where she worked prior to being nominated by President Obama to be chair of the EEOC. Berrien then discussed the initiatives and actions being taken by the EEOC since her appointment to shrink the discrimination seen in the workplace through the charges of discrimination brought forth to the EEOC.

After lunch, an all-female panel presented stories of race, gender, ethnicity, and diversity as well as their roles as scholars and journalists. “Stories of Race, Gender, Ethnicity, and Diversity: The Roles of Scholars and Journalists” was moderated by Special Hagan, who kept the debate flowing and the questions coming in a fascinating panel that explored the many different facets of diversity.

Rebecca K. Lee, an 
Associate Professor of Law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, discussed Fisher v. University of Texas, affirmative action and applying strict scrutiny in higher education. Kimani Paul-Emile, 
an Associate Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law, explained her research of employers use of background checks and criminal records in determining whether to hire an applicant as well as if they will terminate an employee if a record is found. Kathleen Wells, a 
Radio Host 
and Multi Media Journalist, discussed research that showed that we still have a long way to go before discrimination is a thing of the past. Sahar F. Aziz, Associate Professor of Law at 
Texas A&M University School of Law, discussed research she conducted that shows the stereotypes facing women, in particular Muslims, and ways in which these women go about trying to remove these stereotypes. Natasha Martin,
 Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Law
 at Seattle University School of Law, talked about how there are still echoes of Jim Crowe laws in the workplace. Lastly, Professor Elayne E. Greenberg, 
Assistant Dean of Dispute Resolution Programs, Professor of Legal Practice
 and Director of the 
Hugh L. Carey Center for Dispute Resolution at 
St. John’s, discussed implicit biases and how those biases effect decisions made.

The last roundtable of the day discussed affirmative action through the reflections on Fisher v. University of Texas with Professor Gregory, Professor Rebecca Lee, and Professor Gregory’s research students Brendan A. Bertoli ’14, Courtney Chicvak ‘14 
and Sarah Mannix ’15. Bertoli, Chicvak and Mannix discussed their research regarding the Fisher case and how it starts to show where the Supreme Court is heading in regards to Affirmative Action. In addition, Professor Lee provided a deeper analysis from her previous panel discussion into strict scrutiny. Ms. Mannix recalled her experience on the panel as ” a really excellent forum to discuss our research and findings with out practitioners and academics, and a great opportunity for discussion!”

Professor Leonard Baynes, the Ronald H. Brown Professor of Law at St. John’s and Stephanie Rainaud ’15, Symposium Editor for the Journal of Economic and Civil Rights closed out Day One.

Specials thanks to everyone who came out to the Title VII Symposium and who shared their time and experiences on this day.

Mar 30

Title VII at 50 Symposium – THIS WEEK!

The Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society would like to invite any interested students or colleagues to the Title VII at 50 Symposium Conference, which takes place this week on April 4 and 5, 2014.

This program is presented in conjunction with the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, the NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law.

This two-day symposium commemorates Title VII and featuring panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII. Please see the attached program for the events schedule and speakers.

This is an amazing learning and networking opportunity for those interested in labor or employment law, and we encourage any interested party to attend. Please feel free to distribute the program and this email to any groups you are a member of. Scholarships and prizes will be awarded at this event.

The conference is free of charge and open to all, but please RSVP to Paula Edwards at (718) 990-6653 or clel@stjohns.edu.

We hope to see you in attendance at one or both days of the conference.

More Information: http://www.stjohns.edu/about/events/school-law-title-vii-50-two-day-symposium
Program – Title VII at 50 Symposium – 3-27-14

Jan 08

Around the Web – New Year’s Edition!

4950670414_8b5205edc5_mHappy New Year and welcome back to the blog! 2014 started with a bang and promises to be a great year! We are especially excited about the upcoming Title VII at 50 Symposium taking place April 4-5 2014. The year is young but there are already lots of stories on our radar!

Social Media is sure to be a hot topic again this year as employers explore the boundaries of monitoring employees and investigating prospective employees online. This article explores a study where researchers found essentially zero correlation between an applicant’s facebook profile and their actual job performance. Some food for thought next time you want to check out a potential hire online!

A hint of good news for the year ahead? Hiring in the private sector increased in December, says a new report. Private-sector payrolls added over 200,000 positions in December, mainly in manufacturing and construction. The benefits and wages are other topics that will garner attention this year. The Senate voted on Tuesday to advance a three-month extension of unemployment benefits that expired over the holidays and resume negotiations on the long term outcome of the benefits. Many states, including New York, have increased their minimum wages effective December 31, and many more are considering increases in the year ahead.

Fitness is always a hot topic in the month of January, but for some female Marines increasing their arm strength was more than just a New Year’s resolution, it was a job requirement. Starting in 2014, all female Marines were supposed to be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical fitness test and eight for a perfect score. When Only 45% of the women tested could do the 3 pullups, the Marine’s delayed the implementation of new standard. This article explores the requirements and minimum qualifications that women hoping to be trained for combat must meet.

Happy New Year and make sure to add your name to the list for information about the Title VII at 50 Symposium here!

Dec 27

Title VII at 50 Symposium – Save the Date

2014 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that fundamentally altered the landscape of employment relations by prohibiting discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. It is part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which also barred discrimination in public accommodations, public facilities and voting. By its enactment, notions of equality were more deeply embedded in United States public law.

On April 4-5, 2014, the St. John’s Law Review, the Journal for Civil Rights and Economic Development and the St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law, in conjunction with NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development, the St. John’s Center for Labor and Employment Law, and the St. John’s Center of International and Comparative Law, will host a two-day symposium commemorating this important milestone, which will feature panelists and speakers who will assess the past, present and future of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The symposium invites scholars and practitioners to participate in a multi-disciplinary evaluation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

If you would like information about attending this event, please fill out the form below! We will keep your information and contact you with more information in the near future!

Apr 01

Arbitration in Professional Sports Symposium

On April 19, 2013, the Center for Labor and Employment and the Labor Relations and Employment Society will host a spring symposium; presenting a full day of learning focusing on how arbitration has affected labor management relationships in sports. This symposium will bring together key players in the world of sports arbitration. This is a not-to-be missed opportunity to meet, hear, and, most important of all, learn from the people who have been responsible for that, and who know the most about it.

A luncheon address by Donald Fehr, the preeminent sports union leader in the country, and a “fireside chat” with George Nicolau and John Feerick, internationally renowned arbitrators, headline the event, but it also includes sessions in which today’s leading practitioners of both salary and grievance arbitration, on both sides of the labor and management aisle, wilhockeyl describe how those processes work, what interested students need to know about the demands of both, and how the arbitration process has affected labor management relations in their sports.

Please see the event page for a full list of participants. The Center for Labor and Employment Law and the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society are very grateful to all of the speakers. Special thanks to Gene Orza ’73, a cofounder of the St. John’s Labor Relations and Employment Law Society more than 40 years ago. Gene and his successor, Andrew Midgen ‘13, current co-President of the Labor Relations and Employment Law Society, are the driving forces of this symposium. Special thanks also to Jeff Zaino, Vice President of the American Arbitration Association, and Professor Sam Estreicher, Director of the Center for Labor and Employment Law at NYU Law, for collaborating with us on this extraordinary event. We also thank the symposium co-sponsors: The Hugh Carey Center for Dispute Resolution, the Dispute Resolution Society, and the Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Society at St. John’s School of Law.

We would also like to extend special thanks to Frederick Braid ’71 and Ronald Russo ’73 for generously underwriting some of the costs of the symposium.

There is no fee to attend the symposium, but registration is required.  To RSVP please go to the “Contact Us” tab and send us a message with your contact information and the subject line “Arbitration in Professional Sports Event RSVP”. The full-day event qualifies attendee’s for 4 non-transitional CLE credits for a fee of $100. For payment and registration for CLE credit please register for the event at www.stjohns.edu/law/2013clelsymp.

We hope to see you there!